The reason why airLab began was because 1 out of 3 children in West Humboldt Park may have asthma; and since Rosa Parks is in the West Humboldt Park neighborhood, chances are that someone living there has asthma. With that being said, we felt it was our obligation to conduct research on the subject. There to aid us in our research was our guest speaker Dr. Giselle Mosnaim, a doctor at Rush Hospital and board member of the Chicago Asthma Consortium. Dr. Giselle provided us with much information, and was an important source for our research. She went into length about the various triggers and the important of “asthma awareness”. A couple of triggers Dr. Giselle mentioned were animals, dust, changes in weather, chemicals in the air, and mold. She also gave us a couple of facts about how asthma is the third-ranking cause for hospitalization among the children under the age of 15 as well as a leading cause of missed school days. In 2008, 23.3 million Americans suffered from asthma including 7.0 million children.  The research we conducted proved to be very worthwhile and helped us better understand how our project has a “real-world” effect.

Here are some of our findings…

  • In 2006, 131 children under the age of 15 died from asthma. [1]
  • In 2008, 7.8 percent of the U.S population, or 23.3 million Americans, suffered from asthma, including 7.0 million children. [2]
  • A survey of children 6 to 12years of age from Chicago elementary schools found that African Americans were more than twice (21.2%) as likely to have been diagnosed with asthma compared to Caucasians (9.7%) [2]
  • African-Americans were three to four times more likely than whites to be hospitalized for asthma, and were four to six times more likely to die from asthma. [4]
  • Asthma is the third-ranking cause for children to miss school. [5]

Sources

[1]. American Lung Association State of Lung Disease in Diverse Communities.

[2]. www.lungusa.org

[3]. African-American Asthma Statistics Respiratory Health Association of the Metropolitan Chicago.

[4]. http://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/exercising-asthma